• Moisturizing Moisturizing

    Posted on by Jackson Fung

    Lotion, cream, ointments, butter and oil are all moisturizers and they all work to keep the skin moist, soft, and smooth.  In general, they are made up of humectant, emollient, and occlusive agent ingredients.

    Humectants, Emollients, & Occlusive Agents

    Humectant ingredient draws water from the lower level of the skin to rehydrate the epidermis.  Examples: Glycerin, a by product of soap making is a natural humectant.  Hualuronic acid, a synthetic humectant ingredient widely used in commercial moisturizers nowadays.

    Emollient ingredient smooths the layers of the skin, making the skin feels soft and smooth.  Most vegetable oils are emollients.

    Occlusive agent ingredient coats the skin with a thin film to prevent water loss.  Examples: Jojoba oil, olive oil, and castor oil are some examples of occlusive agent ingredients.  Other synthetic ingredients are petrolatum, mineral oil, and lanolin (wool oil).

    Lotion, Cream, Ointment, Butter, & Oil

    Generally speaking lotion, cream, and ointment are all an emulsion (mixture of water & oils).  It is just a matter of the oil-water ratio.  There is no definite ratio but this is how I define these mixtures myself.

    Lotion, is water based meaning mixing oil into higher content of water .  It is thin, absorbed quickly and easily spread on hairy areas.  An synthetic emulsifying agent is required to bond oil & water together.

    Cream, is oil based meaning mixing water into higher content of oils.  It is thicker and commonly used on hand.  An synthetic emulsifying agent is required to bond oil & water together.

    Ointment, is 80% oil and 20% water. 

    Butter, the Body Butter I make contains only oils & butters meaning it is water free.  It is only suitable in winter because it melts in high temperature.  When applied on the skin the butter melts quickly and easily absorbed by the skin.  It gives a slight oily feeling initially but after awhile it leaves the skin smooth and soft.  Suitable for dry skin.

    Oil, pure vegetable oils or blend of various carrier oils & essential oils.  Some people have a misconception of oils that are messy, sticky, waxy, and oily, because they only heard of Olive Oil and Coconut Oil.  Olive Oil and Coconut Oil are both sticky, it is best used in small amount in combination of other oils.  Choosing the right oils is very important there are 20-30 commonly used carrier oils, each has very distinctive characteristics.

    Serum, is not moisturizer.  Serum is more about getting the concentrated nutrients into the skin.  It is usually water based made of smaller molecules to penetrate into the skin quicker and deeper.  Most serums use lab made very concentrated synthetic ingredients.  Serum may not fit everyone, people with sensitive and skin problems should pay extra attention when using serum.

    Lotion, cream, ointments, butter and oil are all moisturizers and they all work to keep the skin moist, soft, and smooth.  In general, they are made up of humectant, emollient, and occlusive agent ingredients.

    Humectants, Emollients, & Occlusive Agents

    Humectant ingredient draws water from the lower level of the skin to rehydrate the epidermis.  Examples: Glycerin, a by product of soap making is a natural humectant.  Hualuronic acid, a synthetic humectant ingredient widely used in commercial moisturizers nowadays.

    Emollient ingredient smooths the layers of the skin, making the skin feels soft and smooth.  Most vegetable oils are emollients.

    Occlusive agent ingredient coats the skin with a thin film to prevent water loss.  Examples: Jojoba oil, olive oil, and castor oil are some examples of occlusive agent ingredients.  Other synthetic ingredients are petrolatum, mineral oil, and lanolin (wool oil).

    Lotion, Cream, Ointment, Butter, & Oil

    Generally speaking lotion, cream, and ointment are all an emulsion (mixture of water & oils).  It is just a matter of the oil-water ratio.  There is no definite ratio but this is how I define these mixtures myself.

    Lotion, is water based meaning mixing oil into higher content of water .  It is thin, absorbed quickly and easily spread on hairy areas.  An synthetic emulsifying agent is required to bond oil & water together.

    Cream, is oil based meaning mixing water into higher content of oils.  It is thicker and commonly used on hand.  An synthetic emulsifying agent is required to bond oil & water together.

    Ointment, is 80% oil and 20% water. 

    Butter, the Body Butter I make contains only oils & butters meaning it is water free.  It is only suitable in winter because it melts in high temperature.  When applied on the skin the butter melts quickly and easily absorbed by the skin.  It gives a slight oily feeling initially but after awhile it leaves the skin smooth and soft.  Suitable for dry skin.

    Oil, pure vegetable oils or blend of various carrier oils & essential oils.  Some people have a misconception of oils that are messy, sticky, waxy, and oily, because they only heard of Olive Oil and Coconut Oil.  Olive Oil and Coconut Oil are both sticky, it is best used in small amount in combination of other oils.  Choosing the right oils is very important there are 20-30 commonly used carrier oils, each has very distinctive characteristics.

    Serum, is not moisturizer.  Serum is more about getting the concentrated nutrients into the skin.  It is usually water based made of smaller molecules to penetrate into the skin quicker and deeper.  Most serums use lab made very concentrated synthetic ingredients.  Serum may not fit everyone, people with sensitive and skin problems should pay extra attention when using serum.

    Read more

  • Hydrating & Moisturizing Hydrating & Moisturizing

    Posted on by Carol Wu

    One of the commonly asked questions we received is "My skin is dry, what should I get?".  "Dry" is a very broad term, it could mean dehydrated skin as a result of lacking water, it could mean dry skin as a result of lacking oil, or both.  People often cannot distinguish between dehydrated and dry skin.

    One of the most common misconceoption is, use oil free products!  People automatically associating oil to breakouts which is not true.  The lack of oil content in the skin can actually cause overdrying.  Overdrying will induce the skin to produce excess oil and causing congestion or breakouts.  

    Hydrating

    Dehydrated skin feels tight and needs to increase the amount of water in the skin (Hydrating).  By keeping the skin hydrated will help make the skin feels smooth, and soft.  Hydration is need for dehydrated skin, however it will need oil (the moisturizer) to protect the hydration from evaporating.

    When it comes to hydrating ingredient, hyaluronic acid is definitely the standard.  Hyaluronic acid can be found naturally in our body, and it holds water a thousand times than its weight and can be absorbted by the skin quickly.

    Moisturizing

    Hydrated skin that lacks moisture will still have a flaky and rough texture. and needs oils to moisturize the skin.  To moisturize the skin, I recommend using oil based products such as vegetable carrier oils containing essential fatty acids, vitamins and antioxidants that nourishes the skin.

    (Note: The sebaceous glands in the skin produces sebum, an oily matter that lubricates, protects, nourishes the skin and prevents the skin from drying.  Sebum plays a vital role in moisturizing the skin.   Vice versa, over production of sebum results in oily skin or acne.) 

    • Dehydrated and not moisturized skin, will look dull, feel tight, and have flaky and rough texture.
    • Hydrated skin but not moisturized, will still have flaky and rough texture. 
    • Moisturized skin but dehydrated, will look dull and feel tight.

    Maximizing the effectiveness!

    Hydrating" is to add water, and "Moisturizing" is to keep water.  It is easy to understand to hydrate then moisture (Serum then Oil).

    • If you have dry skin, apply serum then oil to lock in the water.
    • If you have oily skin or acne you may skip the oil because your skin produces enough to lock in the hydration.

    One of the commonly asked questions we received is "My skin is dry, what should I get?".  "Dry" is a very broad term, it could mean dehydrated skin as a result of lacking water, it could mean dry skin as a result of lacking oil, or both.  People often cannot distinguish between dehydrated and dry skin.

    One of the most common misconceoption is, use oil free products!  People automatically associating oil to breakouts which is not true.  The lack of oil content in the skin can actually cause overdrying.  Overdrying will induce the skin to produce excess oil and causing congestion or breakouts.  

    Hydrating

    Dehydrated skin feels tight and needs to increase the amount of water in the skin (Hydrating).  By keeping the skin hydrated will help make the skin feels smooth, and soft.  Hydration is need for dehydrated skin, however it will need oil (the moisturizer) to protect the hydration from evaporating.

    When it comes to hydrating ingredient, hyaluronic acid is definitely the standard.  Hyaluronic acid can be found naturally in our body, and it holds water a thousand times than its weight and can be absorbted by the skin quickly.

    Moisturizing

    Hydrated skin that lacks moisture will still have a flaky and rough texture. and needs oils to moisturize the skin.  To moisturize the skin, I recommend using oil based products such as vegetable carrier oils containing essential fatty acids, vitamins and antioxidants that nourishes the skin.

    (Note: The sebaceous glands in the skin produces sebum, an oily matter that lubricates, protects, nourishes the skin and prevents the skin from drying.  Sebum plays a vital role in moisturizing the skin.   Vice versa, over production of sebum results in oily skin or acne.) 

    • Dehydrated and not moisturized skin, will look dull, feel tight, and have flaky and rough texture.
    • Hydrated skin but not moisturized, will still have flaky and rough texture. 
    • Moisturized skin but dehydrated, will look dull and feel tight.

    Maximizing the effectiveness!

    Hydrating" is to add water, and "Moisturizing" is to keep water.  It is easy to understand to hydrate then moisture (Serum then Oil).

    • If you have dry skin, apply serum then oil to lock in the water.
    • If you have oily skin or acne you may skip the oil because your skin produces enough to lock in the hydration.

    Read more