Savon de Marseille Savon de Marseille

Posted on by Jackson Fung

Marseille Soap is a traditional soap made with primarily vegetable oil in Marseille, France in the 1300s. The genuine Marseille soap formula contains at least 72% of saponified oil and never contains animal fat.  A genuine Marseille soap is always made with vegetable oils.  It is hypo-allergenic, mild, and moisturizing that it gained popularity around the world. Today, only a very few soap manufacturers in the world are still producing the genuine Savon de Marseille using the traditional method.

The true "Marseilles" soapmaking method is carried out in large cauldrons with ambient pressure and is made up of various phases which alternate as they complete the full process in about 10 days:

Mixing: The oils and fats are added to the cauldron, and alkali is added, triggering the soapmaking process.

Cooking: The mixture is then cooked at a temperature of roughly 100°C during the day and rest at night with constant temperature.

Separation: The soap is then “washed” with water and sea salt to force any impurities and excess glycerin to the very bottom of the cauldron. The impurities are then drawn out through a tap at the bottom of the cauldron.

Liquidation: The pure soap floats at the top of the cauldron.

Concentration: After resting, the soap is pumped into the concentration machine to turn into solid form.

However, Savon de Marseille is not a registered trade mark, everyone can use the name "Marseille Soap" even it is not made in Marseille nor using the traditional method.  So beware when buy Marseille Soap.

Recently, only authentic Marseille soaps produced in Marseille are label with this logo. 

Marseille Soap is a traditional soap made with primarily vegetable oil in Marseille, France in the 1300s. The genuine Marseille soap formula contains at least 72% of saponified oil and never contains animal fat.  A genuine Marseille soap is always made with vegetable oils.  It is hypo-allergenic, mild, and moisturizing that it gained popularity around the world. Today, only a very few soap manufacturers in the world are still producing the genuine Savon de Marseille using the traditional method.

The true "Marseilles" soapmaking method is carried out in large cauldrons with ambient pressure and is made up of various phases which alternate as they complete the full process in about 10 days:

Mixing: The oils and fats are added to the cauldron, and alkali is added, triggering the soapmaking process.

Cooking: The mixture is then cooked at a temperature of roughly 100°C during the day and rest at night with constant temperature.

Separation: The soap is then “washed” with water and sea salt to force any impurities and excess glycerin to the very bottom of the cauldron. The impurities are then drawn out through a tap at the bottom of the cauldron.

Liquidation: The pure soap floats at the top of the cauldron.

Concentration: After resting, the soap is pumped into the concentration machine to turn into solid form.

However, Savon de Marseille is not a registered trade mark, everyone can use the name "Marseille Soap" even it is not made in Marseille nor using the traditional method.  So beware when buy Marseille Soap.

Recently, only authentic Marseille soaps produced in Marseille are label with this logo.